Issues of abortion in ernest hemingways hills like white elephants

She, of course, desires the beauty, loveliness, and fertility of the fields of grain, but she knows that she has to be content with the barren sterility of an imminent abortion and the continued presence of a man who is inadequate. One point of debate is whether or not the woman decides to get an abortion.

Hills Like White Elephants

They were all waiting reasonably for the train. Then class discussion would move toward tone of voice. Careful readers don't believe the girl at the end of the story when she says she's "fine. Since we see the girl acting with condescension and sarcasm right in the first scene when the couple talks about white elephants, we need to keep this attitude in mind when we read there subsequent conversations.

While most critics have espoused relatively straightforward interpretations of the dialogue, a few have argued for alternate scenarios. Word choice and phraseology are keys to its success.

We have no clear ideas about the nature of the discussion abortionand yet the dialogue does convey everything that we conclude about the characters.

Without a baby anchoring them down, they can continue to travel; they can "have everything. She tosses out a conversational, fanciful figure of speech — noting that the hills beyond the train station "look like white elephants" — hoping that the figure of speech will please the man, but he resents her ploy.

He presents only the conversation between them and allows his readers to draw their own conclusions. How do the descriptions of the landscape relate to the conversation between the two travelers?

In other words, it will take an exceptionally perceptive reader to realize immediately that the couple is arguing about the girl's having an abortion at a time when abortions were absolutely illegal, considered immoral, and usually dangerous.

Glossary the Ebro a river in northeastern Spain; the second longest river in Spain. She looks at the hills in the distance and says "They look like white elephants" How do the descriptions of the landscape relate to the conversation between the two travelers?

Synopsis[ edit ] The story focuses on a conversation between an American man and a young woman, described as a "girl," at a Spanish train station while waiting for a train to Madrid. Analysis This story was rejected by early editors and was ignored by anthologists until recently.

Hemingway's Short Stories

Instead he downplays it, while still pushing Jig to have the abortion. However, for the girl, this life of being ever in flux, living in hotels, traveling, and never settling down has become wearying.

This implies that their relationship is dysfunctional, filled with problems only made worse by the pregnancy. Their life of transience, of instability, is described by the girl as living on the surface: She's ambivalent about the choice.

The female is referred to simply as "the girl," and the male is simply called "the man. Only by sheer accident, it seems, is the girl nicknamed "Jig.

Most likely, drawing on the evidence of the discussion of white elephants, we can conclude that Jig is being sarcastic here.

A Farewell to Arms, written ten years after the end of World War One, reflects a growing sense in Europe and the United States of the horror and futility of that war coupled with an unease over its implications for the brutality and sterility of a modern world that was unable to prevent such a bloodbath, despite vaunted claims of technological and social progress indeed, increased technological efficiency had seemed to make war even more horrific.

However, he clearly is insisting that she do so. This story seems a self-critique of that code. Major Themes, Historical Perspectives, and Personal Issues "Hills" is a good story to shatter the false impression that Hemingway was insensitive to women. Once Jig has the abortion, it is clear there will be nothing left for them to do but go their separate ways.

The girl, however, has moved away from the rational world of the man and into her own world of intuition, in which she seemingly knows that the things that she desires will never be fulfilled. Unlike traditional stories, wherein the author usually gives us some clues about what the main characters look like, sound like, or dress like, here we know nothing about "the man" or "the girl.

Coming back, he walked through the barroom, where people waiting for the train were drinking. We sense that she is tired of traveling, of letting the man make all the decisions, of allowing the man to talk incessantly until he convinces her that his way is the right way.

Hills Like White Elephants

On the other hand, we feel that the girl is not at all sure that she wants an abortion. The reader is left asking, "feel what way? What's the purpose of the trip the two travelers are taking?Ernest Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants," tells the story of a man and a woman drinking beer and anise liqueur while they wait at a train station in Spain.

The man is attempting to convince the woman to get an abortion, but the woman is ambivalent about it.

Creative Writing Prompt Contests

A summary of Themes in Ernest Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Hills Like White Elephants and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Ernest Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants" Ernest Hemingway's short story "Hills Like White Elephants" relies on symbolism to carry the theme of either choosing to live selfishly and dealing with the results, or choosing a more difficult and selfless path and reveling in the rewards.

The short story "Hills Like White Elephants," by Ernest Hemingway, is about a young couple and the polemic issue of abortion.

However, since the word "abortion is found nowhere is the story, it is mainly understood through Hemingway's use of literacy elements: setting and imagery/symbolism.

The hills of Spain, to the girl, are like white elephants in their bareness and round, protruding shape. Also notable is that "white elephant" is a term used to refer to something that requires much care and yielding little profit; an object no longer of any value to its owner but of.

Hemingway's Short Stories

A summary of Themes in Ernest Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Hills Like White Elephants and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

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Issues of abortion in ernest hemingways hills like white elephants
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